Us3

Us3 is a British jazz-rap group founded in London in 1992. Their name was inspired by a Horace Parlan recording produced by Alfred Lion, the founder of Blue Note Records. On their debut album, Hand on the Torch, Us3 exclusively used samples from the Blue Note Records catalogue, all originally produced by Lion.

London’s Kiss FM added “The Band Played The Boogie” to its playlist and Wilkinson received a call summoning him to EMI Records’s offices in London. Wilkinson avoided a lawsuit and was granted rights to the archives of Blue Note Records. One of the resulting demos, recorded in March 1992, was “Cantaloop (Flip Fantasia)”, featuring UK trumpeter Gerard Presencer. It sampled Herbie Hancock’s Cantaloupe Island. Two years later, it entered the US top ten and was included on Hand on the Torch, the first Blue Note album to achieve Platinum status (1,000,000 sales) in the USA.

“Cantaloop (Flip Fantasia)” was originally released in October 1992 as the lead single from their debut album Hand on the Torch.

The song was recorded as a demo a year before the group’s first release and features a sample of Herbie Hancock’s song “Cantaloupe Island”. It did not chart in their native UK, but in the US, “Cantaloop (Flip Fantasia)” reached No. 9 on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming the group’s only top 40 single. It was subsequently re-released in UK where it peaked at No. 23.

“Cantaloop” was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) on March 25, 1994 for selling over 500,000 copies.

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Vanilla Ice

Robert Matthew Van Winkle (born October 31, 1967), better known by his stage name Vanilla Ice, is an American rapper, actor, and television host. Born in South Dallas, and raised in Texas and South Florida, Ice released his debut album, Hooked, in 1989 on Ichiban Records, before signing a contract with SBK Records, a record label of the EMI Group, which released a reformatted version of the album in 1990 under the title To the Extreme, which contained Ice’s best-known hit: “Ice Ice Baby”

“Ice Ice Baby” is a hip hop song written by American rapper Vanilla Ice, K. Kennedy, and DJ Earthquake. It was based on the bassline of “Under Pressure” by Queen and David Bowie, who did not receive songwriting credit or royalties until after it had become a hit. Released on his debut album, To the Extreme, it is his best known song. It has appeared in remixed form on Platinum Underground and Vanilla Ice Is Back! A live version appears on the album Extremely Live, while a nu metal version appears on the album Hard to Swallow, under the title “Too Cold”.

“Ice Ice Baby” was first released as the B-side to Vanilla Ice’s cover of “Play That Funky Music”, but the single was not initially successful. When disc jockey David Morales played “Ice Ice Baby” instead, it began to gain success. “Ice Ice Baby” was the first hip hop single to top the Billboard Hot 100. Outside the United States, the song topped the charts in Australia, Belgium, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Ireland and the United Kingdom, thus helping the song diversify hip hop by introducing it to a mainstream audience.

Soul Asylum

Soul Asylum is an American alternative rock band formed in 1981 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Their 1993 hit “Runaway Train” won the Grammy Award for Best Rock Song.

The band was originally called Loud Fast Rules, with a lineup consisting of Dave Pirner, Dan Murphy, Karl Mueller, and Pat Morley.[1] They changed their name to Soul Asylum in 1983. Morley was replaced by Grant Young in 1984. The band recorded three albums with Twin/Tone Records and two with A&M Records, with little commercial success. In 1992, they released the triple-platinum album Grave Dancers Union, featuring “Runaway Train”. The band played at the inauguration of President Bill Clinton early the next year.

In 1998 they recorded Candy from a Stranger. Mueller was diagnosed with cancer in 2004, and the band organized a benefit concert on his behalf. Mueller died a year later.

“Runaway Train” is a power ballad by American rock band Soul Asylum. Its music video is notable for featuring images of missing people, most of them involving young children and adolescent teenagers. Lead singer Dave Pirner has stated that the lyrics originally described his experience of depression.

“Runaway Train” was released in June 1993 as the fourth single from the band’s 1992 album, Grave Dancers Union, and became a success around the world. It reached number five on the US Billboard Hot 100 and climbed to the top position on the Canadian RPM Top Singles chart, earning a gold sales certification from the Recording Industry Association of America and selling 600,000 copies in the US. Outside North America, it reached number two in New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland and peaked within the top five on the charts on several other European countries. The song helped bring their album, Grave Dancers Union, to a multi-platinum level and won a Grammy Award for Best Rock Song in 1994.

Hanson

Hanson is an American pop rock band from Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States, formed by brothers Isaac (guitar, piano, vocals), Taylor (keyboards, vocals), and Zac (drums, vocals). Supporting members include Dimitrius Collins (guitar), and Andrew Perusi (bass) who have toured and performed live with the band since 2007. They are best known for the 1997 hit song “MMMBop” from their debut album released through Mercury/Polygram Records, entitled Middle of Nowhere, which earned three Grammy nominations.

“MMMBop” was released in April 1997 as the lead single from their debut full length studio album, Middle of Nowhere (1997). The song was nominated for two Grammys at the 40th Annual Grammy Awards and is the band’s most successful single to date. “MMMBop” was a major success worldwide, reaching number one in at least 12 countries, including Australia, Canada, Germany, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States.

The song was voted the best single of the year in The Village Voice Pazz & Jop critics poll, while also topping critics’ polls from such media as Rolling Stone, Spin, and VH1, and was ranked No. 20 on VH1’s “100 Greatest Songs of the 90s”, as well as No. 98 on VH1’s “100 Greatest Songs of the Past 25 Years”.

House of Pain

House of Pain was an American hip hop trio who released three albums in the 1990s before lead rapper Everlast left to pursue a solo career. The group’s name is a reference to the H.G. Wells novel The Island of Dr. Moreau, a reference carried further by the naming of their 2011 tour He Who Breaks the Law. The group is best known for its 1992 hit single “Jump Around”, which reached No. 3 in their native United States, No. 6 in Ireland and No. 8 in the United Kingdom.

“Jump Around”, produced by DJ Muggs of the hip hop group Cypress Hill, who has also covered the song. It became a hit in 1992, reaching number 3 in the United States. A 1993 re-release of the song in the United Kingdom, where the initial release had been a minor hit, peaked at number 8. “Jump Around” was featured at position 580 on Q Magazine’s 1001 Best Songs Ever, number 24 on VH1’s 100 Greatest Songs of the 90s, number 66 on VH1’s 100 Greatest Songs of Hip Hop, number 325 on Blender’s 500 Greatest Songs Since You Were Born and number 47 on NME’s 100 Best Songs Of The 1990s. The song is popular among dancehall DJs and is widely regarded in the United Kingdom as a club classic.

he song features a distinctive horn fanfare intro, sampled from Bob & Earl’s 1963 track “Harlem Shuffle”. The song also samples “Popeye the Hitchhiker” by Chubby Checker, but it is best known for a high-pitched squealing sound that appears at the beginning of almost every bar—66 times in the course of the recording.

The origin of the squeal has been the subject of debate. The website WhoSampled credits the 1967 Junior Walker & the All Stars track “Shoot Your Shot”, in which a tenor saxophone makes the noise. However, Americans blogger Anil Dash and musician Questlove of hip-hop band The Roots have insisted on Prince’s “Gett Off” as the source. A Newsweek reader performed a spectrogram where the sample more closely matches “Shoot Your Shot”, and House of Pain member Everlast himself told Questlove that it is a horn making the squeal and not Prince. However, Anil Dash claims the band has denied that the sample is Prince to avoid paying royalties to the singer. For his part, DJ Muggs says the sample came from neither Prince nor Junior Walker.

The music video for “Jump Around” was filmed during the 1992 New York City Saint Patrick’s Day parade. Portions were shot on the parade route as well as in Central Park and Old Town Bar and Restaurant. New York Yankees super fan and Yankee Stadium regular Freddy Schuman can be seen in the parade crowd, ringing his signature shamrock pan near the end of the video.

The video ends with a dedication to the memory of Matt Champy, a friend of the band who died in 1992.

Buckner & Garcia

Buckner & Garcia was an American musical duo consisting of Jerry Buckner and Gary Garcia from Akron, Ohio. Their first recording was made in 1972, when they performed a novelty song called “Gotta Hear the Beat”, which they recorded as Animal Jack. Later, in 1980, they wrote a novelty Christmas song titled “Merry Christmas in the NFL”, imagining sports journalist Howard Cosell as Santa Claus. The recording was credited to Willis the Guard (a character performed by Atlanta radio personality Bob Carr) and fictional group Vigorish. The song reached No. 82 on the Billboard charts but received solid airplay each Christmas for many years. In 1981, the duo wrote a faith-based country theme to back the poem “Footprints in the Sand”, performed by Edgel Groves which reached #1 on many Country and Easy Listening radio stations. The duo also produced an extended version of the WKRP in Cincinnati theme song released on MCA Records in 1982.

However, the duo is best known for the song “Pac-Man Fever”, released in 1981 on a local record label, BGO Records. Shortly after the duo signed a record deal with Columbia/CBS Records and the record was released nationally. An album of the same name quickly followed based entirely of video game songs. The single and album both received gold records for combined sales of over 2 1/2 million copies worldwide.

Capitalizing on the video game craze of the early 1980s, the song, about the classic video game Pac-Man, peaked at number 9 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States in March 1982.

That same month, it was certified Gold by the RIAA for over one million units shipped to retailers; the single sold 1.2 million copies by the end of 1982, and 2.5 million copies in total as of 2008. VH1 ranked it at number 98 on their list of 100 Greatest One Hit Wonders of the 80s.

A follow-up release in May 1982, “Do the Donkey Kong”, just missed the Billboard chart, ranking number 103.

This song was featured in the South Park episode “Splatty Tomato” as well as the Family Guy episode “The D in Apartment 23”, both aired in 2017.

Will to Power

Will to Power is an American dance-pop group that originated in South Florida in the mid-1980s founded by Miami’s Producer Bob Rosenberg. The group recorded a number of hit singles on the Billboard dance and pop charts in the late 1980s and early 1990s, most notably “Baby, I Love Your Way/Freebird Medley”, a medley of 1970s hits by Peter Frampton and Lynyrd Skynyrd that reached the top of the Billboard Hot 100 chart in December 1988.

The song combines elements of two previously recorded rock songs: “Baby, I Love Your Way”, a #12 Billboard Hot 100 hit from 1976 by the British-born singer Peter Frampton, and American Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd’s song “Free Bird”, which hit #19 on the Hot 100 chart in 1975. It spent one week at #1 on the Hot 100 chart dated December 3, 1988. It also peaked at #2 on the Billboard adult contemporary chart.

In March and April 2009, VH1 ran a countdown of the 100 Greatest One Hit Wonders of the 80s. Will to Power’s “Baby, I Love Your Way/Freebird Medley” placed at #97 on the countdown

Club Nouveau

Club Nouveau is an American R&B group formed by record producer/performer Jay King in 1986 in Sacramento, California following the breakup of the Timex Social Club. The group’s name (French for “New Club”) was changed from its original incarnation, “Jet Set”, to capitalize on the breakup. The group was signed by Warner Bros. Records, on which Club Nouveau released its first three albums. Club Nouveau’s version of Bill Withers’ song “Lean on Me” won a Grammy award for Best R&B Song in 1987.

The R&B group Club Nouveau covered the song and took it to number one for two weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 charts in March 1987. It also reached number one on the dance charts, and number two on the Black Singles charts, kept out of the top spot by Jody Watley’s “Looking for a New Love”. It won a Grammy award in 1987 for Bill Withers, as the writer, for Best R&B Song. This version of “Lean on Me” is known for the addition of the faux-reggae refrain “We be jammin’! We be jammin’!”, which was highly acclaimed as ingenious and revolutionary at the time.

The song ranked at number 94 in VH1’s 100 Greatest One-hit Wonders of the 80s

Frank Stallone

Francesco “Frank” Stallone, Jr. (born July 30, 1950) is an American actor, singer-songwriter and guitarist. He is the younger brother of Sylvester Stallone and wrote music for his movies. His song “Far from Over”, which appeared in the 1983 film Staying Alive and was also featured in the film’s soundtrack, peaked at number ten on the Billboard Hot 100, for which he received Golden Globe and Grammy nominations.

“Far from Over” appeared in the 1983 film Staying Alive and was also featured in the film’s soundtrack. The song was written by Stallone and Vince DiCola. The song was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song. The song was remixed by Jellybean Benitez.

It was a top-ten U.S. single in September 1983, peaking at number ten on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming his only major hit. The 7″ single version is slightly different from the LP version, and it was the 7″ version which was played on most radio stations in the US while on the Billboard Hot 100. In the U.S., the song became RSO Records’ final top 10 single and top 40 hit on the Billboard Hot 100.

Patrice Rushen

Patrice Louise Rushen (born September 30, 1954) is an American jazz pianist and R&B singer. She is also a composer, record producer, multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, and music director. Her 1982 single, “Forget Me Nots”, received a Grammy Award nomination for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance.

“Forget Me Nots” is a song co-written and performed by American R&B musician Patrice Rushen. The song appears on Rushen’s seventh album Straight from the Heart (1982). Making a radical shift in her music, Rushen would continue to harness the particular style of this record all through to her next album Now (1984). Originally deemed by record label executives as a “flop”, the song became a Top 40 pop (#23), Top 5 R&B (#4), and Top 5 dance (#2) hit on the Billboard charts and is the hit for which she is best known.

The single’s success culminated in Rushen scoring her first nomination for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance at the 1983 Grammy Awards. Rushen had a number of songs on the R&B and Dance charts, but “Forget Me Nots” was her only US Top 40 pop hit and ranked #85 on VH1’s 100 Greatest One Hit Wonders of the 1980s in 2009.

The bassline is particularly recognizable, and was performed on the record by session bass player Freddie Washington. The classic tenor saxophone solo was played by Los Angeles session player and recording artist, Gerald Albright. Albright also appears in the music video of the song.

The lyrics are from the point of view of one professing her longing for a rekindling with an ex-lover. She ruminates on the romance’s end, and sends the lover forget-me-nots, a flower that since medieval times has been given and worn to symbolize enduring love despite absence or separation.