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Marc Craig Cohn (born July 5, 1959) is an American folk rock singer-songwriter and musician. He won the Grammy Award for Best New Artist in 1992. Cohn is best known for the song “Walking in Memphis” from his eponymous 1991 album; the song, which was a Top 40 hit, has been described as “an iconic part of the Great American Songbook.”

“Walking in Memphis” was originally recorded by American singer-songwriter Marc Cohn, for whom it remains his signature song. It received a Song of the Year nomination at the 34th Grammy Awards.

“Walking in Memphis” reached number 13 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1991. It is the only top-forty hit for Cohn. The song reached number three in Canada, number seven in Ireland, and number 11 in Australia. “Walking in Memphis” has since been covered several times, notably in 1995 by Cher and in 2003 by Lonestar.

Cohn has said that “Walking in Memphis” is “100 percent autobiographical”. He has described it as a song about “a Jewish gospel-music-lover”, and added that “the song is about more than just a place; it’s about a kind of spiritual awakening, one of those trips where you’re different when you leave. He was inspired to write “Walking in Memphis” by a 1985 visit to the Memphis, Tennessee, area. At the time, he was working as a session singer in New York City while pursuing a recording contract.

Released as the first single from Cohn’s self-titled debut album in March 1991, “Walking in Memphis” debuted at number 87 on the US Hot 100 in Billboard magazine dated March 30, 1991 with a subsequent two-month gradual chart ascent to the top 40, the single’s number 38 ranking on the Hot 100 dated May 25, 1991, inaugurating a ten-week top 40 tenure with a peak of number 13 for two weeks, the first week of which was dated July 6, 1991—one day after Cohn’s birthday. Overall “Walking in Memphis” spent 23 weeks on the Hot 100. “Walking in Memphis” was also a hit on Billboard’s Adult Contemporary chart (number 12) and crossed-over to the magazine’s C&W chart (number 74). In Canada the song peaked at number three on the week dated July 13, 1991.

During its original release, “Walking in Memphis” reached number seven in Ireland but stalled at number 66 in the United Kingdom;[13][14] its September 1991 re-release returned “Walking in Memphis” to the Irish top 20 at number 16 and introduced the single to the UK top 30 with a peak of number 22. (The re-release of “Walking in Memphis” replaced the original B-side: “Dig Down Deep,” with a live version of “Silver Thunderbird” recorded July 17, 1991.) “Walking in Memphis” was also a top-twenty hit in both Australia and New Zealand, with respective chart peaks of number 11 and number 18. In Europe, the single charted in France (number 45), Germany (number 25), the Netherlands (number 54) and Sweden (number 36).

At the 34th Grammy Awards in February 1992, “Walking in Memphis” was nominated for Song of the Year. Also, Cohn was nominated for the Best Pop Male Vocalist award for his vocals in “Walking in Memphis”. Cohn did not win either award, although he did win the Grammy for Best New Artist that same year.

Cornershop

Cornershop are a British indie rock band best known for their single “Brimful of Asha”, originally released in 1997 and, in a remixed version, topping the UK chart in 1998. The band was formed in 1991 by Wolverhampton-born Tjinder Singh (singer, songwriter, and guitar), his brother Avtar Singh (bass guitar, vocals), David Chambers (drums) and Ben Ayres (guitar, keyboards, and tamboura), the first three having previously been members of Preston-based band General Havoc, who released one single (the “Fast Jaspal EP”) in 1991. The band name originated from a stereotype referring to British Asians often owning corner shops. Their music is a fusion of Indian music, indie rock, alternative and electronic dance music.

“Brimful of Asha” is a single by British alternative rock band Cornershop from their third album When I Was Born for the 7th Time. The recording originally reached number 60 on the UK Singles Chart in 1997. After a remixed version by Norman Cook became a radio and critical success, the song was re-released and reached number one on the UK chart and number 16 on the US Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart. The lyric is a tribute to Asha Bhosle.

This song is based on the history of film culture in India. Since their beginnings, Indian films have relied heavily on song-and-dance numbers. The singing is almost always performed by background singers while the actors and actresses lip sync. Asha Bhosle is a playback singer who has sung over 12,000 songs and is referred to as “Sadi rani” (Punjabi for “our queen”) at one point in the lyrics. In the slower, original album recording, playback singers Lata Mangeshkar (her older sibling) and Mohammed Rafi (one of the top male playback singers of the mid-century) are mentioned. The lyrics in the bridge contain a number of references to non-Indian music, including Georges Brassens’ song “Les Amoureux des bancs publics”, Jacques Dutronc, Marc Bolan, Argo Records and Trojan Records.

DJ Norman Cook (“Fatboy Slim”) was asked to remix the track by speeding it up and modulating the song to a higher key (halfway between B-flat and B, rather than in A). The remix saw major success as a number 1 single.

Deee-Lite

Deee-Lite was an American house and dance music group formed in New York City. The group’s best-known single is “Groove Is in the Heart”, which was released in 1990 from their debut studio album World Clique (1990), and was a top-ten hit in multiple countries. In December 2016, Billboard ranked them as the 55th most successful dance artists of all time. The band began in 1986 as a duo in New York City with Lady Miss Kier (born Kierin Magenta Kirby) primarily on vocals and Supa DJ Dmitry (born in Ukraine as Dmitry Brill) as the DJ, but became a trio when Jungle DJ Towa Tei (Japanese-born Dong-hwa Chung) joined the group in 1988.

Initially, Kier and Dmitry performed their songs monthly in numerous downtown NYC nightclubs from 1986 onwards. In 1987, Kier bought the Akai sampler, which influenced their sound tremendously, hence the name of their production company: “Sampladelic”. From the band’s inception, Kier designed the posters and club invites and was also the graphic designer for all three albums and 12″ singles. The band played in both hip-hop and house clubs, and both gay and straight clubs, including Wigstock and opening for Native Tongue Movement’s De La Soul and Jungle Brothers. As described in Rolling Stone, “they were drawing vivid, multiracial, pan-sexual crowds…”. Part of the band’s appeal was its inclusiveness, as noted by Mademoiselle magazine “as a group, they’re a festival of individuality; as a band, they’re a party anyone can attend”

“Groove Is in the Heart” is a song by American dance band Deee-Lite. It was released in August 1990 as the lead single from their debut album, World Clique. The song was a hit in many countries, reaching number one in Australia.

Though the album version was not recorded until 1990, the song was originally written in the late 1980s; it was performed live as early as 1989. The backing track was built around many samples, primarily the main riff from Herbie Hancock’s track “Bring Down the Birds” from the Blowup soundtrack and Vernon Burch’s “Get Up”, which provided the drum track and also formed the basis for the breakdown featuring a slide whistle. Parliament-Funkadelic bassist Bootsy Collins provided guest vocals, and the rap is provided by Q-Tip of A Tribe Called Quest.

AllMusic editor Ned Raggett wrote in his review of World Clique, “Its reputation may rest on only one hit single — but what a hit. ‘Groove Is in the Heart’ defined the summer of 1990 on radio and MTV with its delicious combination of funk, modern dance sheen, and Lady Miss Kier’s smart, sharp diva ways. Add in guest vocals and bass from Bootsy Collins (a pity his hilarious video cameo wasn’t represented here), brass from the original Horny Horns duo of Fred Wesley and Maceo Parker, and a smooth mid-song rap from A Tribe Called Quest’s Q-Tip, and the results sounded good then and now.” Bill Coleman from Billboard commented, “Sometimes you can believe the hype. Hot New York underground dance trio more than lives up to prerelease push with this sizzling groove’n’sample funk jam, kicked into gear by the sultry and charismatic vocal presence of future diva Lady Miss Kier.” He also added, “”Groove” is, well, very groovy. A house-paced track with a hip-hop sensibility”. Matt Stopera and Brian Galindo from BuzzFeed noted that it is a “perfect little slice of the early ’90s New York club scene.” Bevan Hannan from The Canberra Times described the song as “good fun”. David Giles from Music Week said it’s a “fine single”. He added, “Pure Seventies funk with a Niteties groove.” Helen Mead from NME stated that it is “playfully funky”. The magazine also called it a “pretty faultless collage of G-Funk, Daisy Age hip-hop, salsa and dippy disco.” People noted it as “hopping”. Ross Grady from The Rice Thresher said it is “one of the creamiest slabs of vinyl ever to come from the house music scene.” Slant Magazine ranked the song second in its 100 Greatest Dance Songs list, adding: “No song delivered the group’s world-conscious Word as colorfully and open-heartedly as ‘Groove Is in the Heart,’ which flew up the Billboard charts while goosing stuffed shirts”. Caroline Sullivan from Smash Hits wrote that the “ripping floor filler” has “got the samples and twiddly electronoises so necessary for dancefloor success nowadays, but there’s also a hummable melody and sense of humour about it all.” NME and The Village Voice’s Pazz & Jop annual critics’ poll named “Groove Is in the Heart” the best single released in the year 1990.

The Raconteurs

The Raconteurs are an American rock band from Detroit, Michigan, formed in 2005. The band consists of Jack White (vocals, guitar), Brendan Benson (vocals, guitar), Jack Lawrence (bass guitar), and Patrick Keeler (drums). Lawrence and Keeler were originally members of the Greenhornes, while White and Lawrence went on to become members of the Dead Weather.

“Steady, As She Goes” is the debut single by the rock band The Raconteurs from their first album Broken Boy Soldiers.

A limited edition, 7-inch, 45 rpm vinyl record, was released in Europe on January 30, 2006, and in North America on March 7, 2006. It was a double A-sided single, with the relatively unpromoted “Store Bought Bones” as the flipside. A CD version of “Steady, As She Goes” was released on April 24 with the B-side “Bane Rendition”. Two further vinyl releases were produced: the first (marked ‘B’) with “Store Bought Bones” as the B-side; the second (marked ‘C’) an acoustic rendition of “Steady, As She Goes” with “Call It a Day” as the B-side. In the US, the song reached number 54 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number one on the Modern Rock Tracks chart. It achieved top ten success in the UK, where it peaked at number four, and Canada, peaking at number three.

Entertainment Weekly said the track is “less weird than what we’re used to from the ghostly singer.” Rolling Stone called “Steady, As She Goes” the second best song of 2006, just behind “Crazy” by Gnarls Barkley. The bass in the song, especially in the intro, has drawn comparisons to the song “Is She Really Going Out With Him?”, by Joe Jackson.

In 2007, “Steady, As She Goes” was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.

Us3

Us3 is a British jazz-rap group founded in London in 1992. Their name was inspired by a Horace Parlan recording produced by Alfred Lion, the founder of Blue Note Records. On their debut album, Hand on the Torch, Us3 exclusively used samples from the Blue Note Records catalogue, all originally produced by Lion.

London’s Kiss FM added “The Band Played The Boogie” to its playlist and Wilkinson received a call summoning him to EMI Records’s offices in London. Wilkinson avoided a lawsuit and was granted rights to the archives of Blue Note Records. One of the resulting demos, recorded in March 1992, was “Cantaloop (Flip Fantasia)”, featuring UK trumpeter Gerard Presencer. It sampled Herbie Hancock’s Cantaloupe Island. Two years later, it entered the US top ten and was included on Hand on the Torch, the first Blue Note album to achieve Platinum status (1,000,000 sales) in the USA.

“Cantaloop (Flip Fantasia)” was originally released in October 1992 as the lead single from their debut album Hand on the Torch.

The song was recorded as a demo a year before the group’s first release and features a sample of Herbie Hancock’s song “Cantaloupe Island”. It did not chart in their native UK, but in the US, “Cantaloop (Flip Fantasia)” reached No. 9 on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming the group’s only top 40 single. It was subsequently re-released in UK where it peaked at No. 23.

“Cantaloop” was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) on March 25, 1994 for selling over 500,000 copies.

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Vanilla Ice

Robert Matthew Van Winkle (born October 31, 1967), better known by his stage name Vanilla Ice, is an American rapper, actor, and television host. Born in South Dallas, and raised in Texas and South Florida, Ice released his debut album, Hooked, in 1989 on Ichiban Records, before signing a contract with SBK Records, a record label of the EMI Group, which released a reformatted version of the album in 1990 under the title To the Extreme, which contained Ice’s best-known hit: “Ice Ice Baby”

“Ice Ice Baby” is a hip hop song written by American rapper Vanilla Ice, K. Kennedy, and DJ Earthquake. It was based on the bassline of “Under Pressure” by Queen and David Bowie, who did not receive songwriting credit or royalties until after it had become a hit. Released on his debut album, To the Extreme, it is his best known song. It has appeared in remixed form on Platinum Underground and Vanilla Ice Is Back! A live version appears on the album Extremely Live, while a nu metal version appears on the album Hard to Swallow, under the title “Too Cold”.

“Ice Ice Baby” was first released as the B-side to Vanilla Ice’s cover of “Play That Funky Music”, but the single was not initially successful. When disc jockey David Morales played “Ice Ice Baby” instead, it began to gain success. “Ice Ice Baby” was the first hip hop single to top the Billboard Hot 100. Outside the United States, the song topped the charts in Australia, Belgium, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Ireland and the United Kingdom, thus helping the song diversify hip hop by introducing it to a mainstream audience.

Soul Asylum

Soul Asylum is an American alternative rock band formed in 1981 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Their 1993 hit “Runaway Train” won the Grammy Award for Best Rock Song.

The band was originally called Loud Fast Rules, with a lineup consisting of Dave Pirner, Dan Murphy, Karl Mueller, and Pat Morley.[1] They changed their name to Soul Asylum in 1983. Morley was replaced by Grant Young in 1984. The band recorded three albums with Twin/Tone Records and two with A&M Records, with little commercial success. In 1992, they released the triple-platinum album Grave Dancers Union, featuring “Runaway Train”. The band played at the inauguration of President Bill Clinton early the next year.

In 1998 they recorded Candy from a Stranger. Mueller was diagnosed with cancer in 2004, and the band organized a benefit concert on his behalf. Mueller died a year later.

“Runaway Train” is a power ballad by American rock band Soul Asylum. Its music video is notable for featuring images of missing people, most of them involving young children and adolescent teenagers. Lead singer Dave Pirner has stated that the lyrics originally described his experience of depression.

“Runaway Train” was released in June 1993 as the fourth single from the band’s 1992 album, Grave Dancers Union, and became a success around the world. It reached number five on the US Billboard Hot 100 and climbed to the top position on the Canadian RPM Top Singles chart, earning a gold sales certification from the Recording Industry Association of America and selling 600,000 copies in the US. Outside North America, it reached number two in New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland and peaked within the top five on the charts on several other European countries. The song helped bring their album, Grave Dancers Union, to a multi-platinum level and won a Grammy Award for Best Rock Song in 1994.

Hanson

Hanson is an American pop rock band from Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States, formed by brothers Isaac (guitar, piano, vocals), Taylor (keyboards, vocals), and Zac (drums, vocals). Supporting members include Dimitrius Collins (guitar), and Andrew Perusi (bass) who have toured and performed live with the band since 2007. They are best known for the 1997 hit song “MMMBop” from their debut album released through Mercury/Polygram Records, entitled Middle of Nowhere, which earned three Grammy nominations.

“MMMBop” was released in April 1997 as the lead single from their debut full length studio album, Middle of Nowhere (1997). The song was nominated for two Grammys at the 40th Annual Grammy Awards and is the band’s most successful single to date. “MMMBop” was a major success worldwide, reaching number one in at least 12 countries, including Australia, Canada, Germany, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States.

The song was voted the best single of the year in The Village Voice Pazz & Jop critics poll, while also topping critics’ polls from such media as Rolling Stone, Spin, and VH1, and was ranked No. 20 on VH1’s “100 Greatest Songs of the 90s”, as well as No. 98 on VH1’s “100 Greatest Songs of the Past 25 Years”.

House of Pain

House of Pain was an American hip hop trio who released three albums in the 1990s before lead rapper Everlast left to pursue a solo career. The group’s name is a reference to the H.G. Wells novel The Island of Dr. Moreau, a reference carried further by the naming of their 2011 tour He Who Breaks the Law. The group is best known for its 1992 hit single “Jump Around”, which reached No. 3 in their native United States, No. 6 in Ireland and No. 8 in the United Kingdom.

“Jump Around”, produced by DJ Muggs of the hip hop group Cypress Hill, who has also covered the song. It became a hit in 1992, reaching number 3 in the United States. A 1993 re-release of the song in the United Kingdom, where the initial release had been a minor hit, peaked at number 8. “Jump Around” was featured at position 580 on Q Magazine’s 1001 Best Songs Ever, number 24 on VH1’s 100 Greatest Songs of the 90s, number 66 on VH1’s 100 Greatest Songs of Hip Hop, number 325 on Blender’s 500 Greatest Songs Since You Were Born and number 47 on NME’s 100 Best Songs Of The 1990s. The song is popular among dancehall DJs and is widely regarded in the United Kingdom as a club classic.

he song features a distinctive horn fanfare intro, sampled from Bob & Earl’s 1963 track “Harlem Shuffle”. The song also samples “Popeye the Hitchhiker” by Chubby Checker, but it is best known for a high-pitched squealing sound that appears at the beginning of almost every bar—66 times in the course of the recording.

The origin of the squeal has been the subject of debate. The website WhoSampled credits the 1967 Junior Walker & the All Stars track “Shoot Your Shot”, in which a tenor saxophone makes the noise. However, Americans blogger Anil Dash and musician Questlove of hip-hop band The Roots have insisted on Prince’s “Gett Off” as the source. A Newsweek reader performed a spectrogram where the sample more closely matches “Shoot Your Shot”, and House of Pain member Everlast himself told Questlove that it is a horn making the squeal and not Prince. However, Anil Dash claims the band has denied that the sample is Prince to avoid paying royalties to the singer. For his part, DJ Muggs says the sample came from neither Prince nor Junior Walker.

The music video for “Jump Around” was filmed during the 1992 New York City Saint Patrick’s Day parade. Portions were shot on the parade route as well as in Central Park and Old Town Bar and Restaurant. New York Yankees super fan and Yankee Stadium regular Freddy Schuman can be seen in the parade crowd, ringing his signature shamrock pan near the end of the video.

The video ends with a dedication to the memory of Matt Champy, a friend of the band who died in 1992.

Buckner & Garcia

Buckner & Garcia was an American musical duo consisting of Jerry Buckner and Gary Garcia from Akron, Ohio. Their first recording was made in 1972, when they performed a novelty song called “Gotta Hear the Beat”, which they recorded as Animal Jack. Later, in 1980, they wrote a novelty Christmas song titled “Merry Christmas in the NFL”, imagining sports journalist Howard Cosell as Santa Claus. The recording was credited to Willis the Guard (a character performed by Atlanta radio personality Bob Carr) and fictional group Vigorish. The song reached No. 82 on the Billboard charts but received solid airplay each Christmas for many years. In 1981, the duo wrote a faith-based country theme to back the poem “Footprints in the Sand”, performed by Edgel Groves which reached #1 on many Country and Easy Listening radio stations. The duo also produced an extended version of the WKRP in Cincinnati theme song released on MCA Records in 1982.

However, the duo is best known for the song “Pac-Man Fever”, released in 1981 on a local record label, BGO Records. Shortly after the duo signed a record deal with Columbia/CBS Records and the record was released nationally. An album of the same name quickly followed based entirely of video game songs. The single and album both received gold records for combined sales of over 2 1/2 million copies worldwide.

Capitalizing on the video game craze of the early 1980s, the song, about the classic video game Pac-Man, peaked at number 9 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States in March 1982.

That same month, it was certified Gold by the RIAA for over one million units shipped to retailers; the single sold 1.2 million copies by the end of 1982, and 2.5 million copies in total as of 2008. VH1 ranked it at number 98 on their list of 100 Greatest One Hit Wonders of the 80s.

A follow-up release in May 1982, “Do the Donkey Kong”, just missed the Billboard chart, ranking number 103.

This song was featured in the South Park episode “Splatty Tomato” as well as the Family Guy episode “The D in Apartment 23”, both aired in 2017.