Bobby “Boris” Pickett

Robert George Pickett (February 11, 1938 – April 25, 2007), known by the pen name Bobby “Boris” Pickett, was an American singer, songwriter, actor and comedian known for co-writing and performing the 1962 hit novelty song “Monster Mash.”

“Monster Mash” is a 1962 novelty song and the best-known song by Bobby “Boris” Pickett. The song was released as a single on Gary S. Paxton’s Garpax Records label in August 1962 along with a full-length LP called The Original Monster Mash, which contained several other monster-themed tunes. The “Monster Mash” single was #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on October 20–27 of that year, just before Halloween. It has been a perennial holiday favorite ever since.

Divinyls

Divinyls were an Australian rock band that was formed in Sydney in 1980. The band primarily consisted of vocalist Chrissy Amphlett and guitarist Mark McEntee. Amphlett garnered widespread attention for performing on stage in a school uniform and fishnet stockings, and often used an illuminated neon tube as a prop for displaying aggression towards both band members and the audience. Originally a five-piece, the band underwent numerous line-up changes, with Amphlett and McEntee remaining as core members, before its dissolution in 1996.

“I Touch Myself” is a song written and recorded by the Australian rock band Divinyls. It was released in November 1990 as the lead single from their fifth album, diVINYLS, and is a paean to eroticism, orgasm and female masturbation.

The single achieved great success, reaching number four on the U.S Billboard Hot 100 on 18 May 1991; meanwhile in their native country, Australia, the single reached the number one position. The song was written by Divinyls band members Christina Amphlett and Mark McEntee and professional songwriters Tom Kelly and Billy Steinberg. It has since been covered by numerous artists.

Afroman

Joseph Edgar Foreman (born July 28, 1974), known professionally as Afroman, is an American rapper, singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist. He is known for his song “Because I Got High”, which was released in 2001 and featured on his album The Good Times. Afroman was nominated for a Grammy award in 2002.

“Because I Got High” is a song by American rapper Afroman from his album of the same name. The lyrics of the song describe how cannabis use is degrading the narrator’s quality of life. The song, which was written in only a few minutes, rose from obscurity to popularity after it was circulated around the Internet and was featured on The Howard Stern Show.

The song explains how the narrator has forgotten to clean his room, failed his college class (which he plans to take next semester), sold kush (after losing his job), missed court dates, had his paycheck garnished due to missed child support payments, gambled away his car payment, became a paraplegic as the result of a police chase, lost his family (including his wife and children), had ruined his “entire life”, and is now homeless “because [he] got high” – he ultimately decides to end the song, and states that he is “singing the whole thing wrong, because [he is] high”. After this, Afroman mentions his name and birthplace (East Palmdale), says the tumbleweed he smokes is “bomb as hell” and then says he does not believe in Hitler (a reference to John Lennon’s “God”). The music video was directed by Kevin Smith and featured Jay and Silent Bob smoking with Afroman, a cameo by ‘Beer Man’, as well as a glimpse of the Quick Stop where Clerks was filmed.

OMC

OMC, or Otara Millionaires Club, was a New Zealand music group. They were best known for their 1996 hit “How Bizarre”, named one of the greatest New Zealand songs of all time by the Australasian Performing Right Association. The full name of the band is a tongue-in-cheek reference to Otara’s status as one of the poorest suburbs of Auckland.

“How Bizarre” is a single written and recorded by New Zealand musical group OMC. It was released in December 1995 as the lead single from the group’s debut album of the same name, and went on to top the charts in at least five countries, including Australia, Canada and Ireland. Outside New Zealand, OMC are generally considered a one-hit wonder; they had a further few successful singles in New Zealand, including “Land of Plenty”. The song was featured in the 1998 movies Palmetto and Disney’s The Parent Trap and plays at the start of the first episode of the second season of American sitcom Clueless.

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The Knack

The Knack was an American rock band based in Los Angeles that rose to fame with their first single, “My Sharona”, an international number-one hit in 1979.

“My Sharona” is the debut single by the Knack. The song was written by Berton Averre and Doug Fieger, and released in 1979 from their album Get the Knack. It reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart where it remained for 6 weeks, and was number one on Billboard’s 1979 Top Pop Singles year-end chart.

It was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America, representing half a million copies sold, and was Capitol Records’ fastest gold status debut single since the Beatles’ “I Want to Hold Your Hand” in 1964

Patrick Hernandez

Patrick Hernandez (born 6 April 1949 in Le Blanc-Mesnil, Seine-Saint-Denis, France) is a French singer who had a worldwide hit with “Born to Be Alive” in 1979

“Born to Be Alive” is a song written by French singer Patrick Hernandez. It became a worldwide hit and reached number one on the US Disco chart. It was first conceived as a hard rock song. It first became a hit in France, and has become one of the biggest singles in that country.T he song also gained gold status in the USA.

After working for about a year, the songs were released on the Aariana sub-label Aquarius Records (in France) in November 1978. The first single that was released was the disco song “Born to Be Alive”. Its success was immediate, and in January 1979, Hernandez received his first gold record from Italy. The song spread throughout Europe, where it hit #1 in France in April and remained there until July. By then, the United States had caught on, and after some remixing, the record was signed to the A-Tom-Mik label and later Columbia Records. The remixed version was released on a commercial 12″ single, and it peaked in the US Billboard Hot Dance Club Play chart at #1 and crossed over to the Billboard Hot 100 peaking at #16. It sold over one million copies in the US. The track reached #10 in the UK Singles Chart. By year’s end, Hernandez had racked up fifty-two gold and platinum record awards from more than fifty different countries.

The Buggles

The Buggles are an English new wave band formed in London, England, in 1977 by singer and bassist Trevor Horn and keyboardist Geoffrey Downes. They are best known for 1979 debut single “Video Killed the Radio Star”, which topped the UK Singles Chart and reached number one in 15 other countries.

“Video Killed the Radio Star” is a song written by Trevor Horn, Geoff Downes and Bruce Woolley in 1978. It was first recorded by Bruce Woolley and The Camera Club (with Thomas Dolby on keyboards) for their album English Garden, and later by British group the Buggles, consisting of Horn and Downes. The track was recorded and mixed in 1979, released as their debut single on 7 September 1979 by Island Records, and included on their first album The Age of Plastic. The backing track was recorded at Virgin’s Town House in West London, and mixing and vocal recording would later take place at Sarm East Studios.

The song relates to concerns about mixed attitudes towards 20th-century inventions and machines for the media arts. Musically, the song performs like an extended jingle and the composition plays in the key of D-flat major in common time at a tempo of 132 beats per minute. The track has been positively received, with reviewers praising its unusual musical pop elements. Although the song includes several common pop characteristics and six basic chords are used in its structure, Downes and writer Timothy Warner described the piece as musically complicated, due to its use of suspended and minor ninth chords for enhancement that gave the song a “slightly different feel.”

Upon release, the single topped sixteen international music charts, including those in the UK, Australia, and Japan. It also peaked within the top 10 in Canada, Germany, New Zealand and South Africa, but only reached number 40 in the US. The accompanying music video was written, directed, and edited by Russell Mulcahy. It was the first music video shown on MTV in the US, airing at 12:01 a.m. on 1 August 1981, and the first video shown on MTV Classic in the UK on 1 March 2010. The song has received several critical accolades, such as being ranked number 40 on VH1’s 100 Greatest One-Hit Wonders of the ’80s. It has also been covered by many recording artists.

The Vapors

The Vapors are an English new wave and power pop band that initially existed between 1978 and 1981. They had a top ten hit with the song “Turning Japanese” in 1980, which reached No. 3 in the UK Singles Chart, and No. 36 in the US Billboard Hot 100.

“Turning Japanese” is a song that was released by English band the Vapors, from their 1980 album New Clear Days. It was an international hit, and is the song for which The Vapors are best known.

The lyric describe the narrator being separated from a woman he loves and thus preoccupied with photos of her. The repeated lyrical refrain of “I think I’m turning Japanese” was widely believed by Americans to describe an orgasm induced by masturbating, but actually was intended to describe teen angst or alienation after a romantic breakup. The song prominently features an Oriental riff played on guitar.

Lipps Inc.

Lipps Inc. was an American disco and funk group from Minneapolis, Minnesota. The group was best known for the chart-topping 1980 worldwide hit single “Funkytown” which hit No. 1 in 28 different countries around the world and was certified as double-platinum in sales.

“Funkytown” is a song by American disco act Lipps Inc. from their debut album Mouth to Mouth (1979). It was released as the album’s lead single in 1980.

“Funkytown” reached the top spot in the United States, West Germany, Canada, Austria, Switzerland, Norway, the Netherlands, and Australia, among many others

“Funkytown” entered the US Billboard Hot 100 on March 29, 1980 and spent four weeks at number one, from May 31 to June 21, 1980. It also hit the number one spot on the disco chart in 1980. It also reached no. 2 in the United Kingdom, and Sweden, as well as on the U.S. soul chart (it was held out of the top spot of the Billboard Soul Chart by “Let’s Get Serious” by Jermaine Jackson for five weeks, from May 24 to June 21). The song was Lipps Inc’s only American Top 40 hit.

Bobby McFerrin

Robert Keith McFerrin Jr. (born March 11, 1950) is an American jazz vocalist. He is known for his vocal techniques, such as singing fluidly but with quick and considerable jumps in pitch—for example, sustaining a melody while also rapidly alternating with arpeggios and harmonies—as well as scat singing, polyphonic overtone singing, and improvisational vocal percussion. He is widely known for performing and recording regularly as an unaccompanied solo vocal artist. He has frequently collaborated with other artists from both the jazz and classical scenes.

McFerrin’s song “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” was a No. 1 U.S. pop hit in 1988 and won Song of the Year and Record of the Year honors at the 1989 Grammy Awards.

“Don’t Worry, Be Happy” is a popular worldwide hit song by American musician Bobby McFerrin released in September 1988. It was the first a cappella song to reach number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart which it held for two weeks.